Should You Join A Coding Bootcamp? Ask Yourself These Questions First

pexels-photo-90807Bootcamps are a great way to get into a programming career if you are motivated but lack the skills. Reputable programs boast a 95% success rate if you follow their career services guidelines; once you land a job as a junior developer, you will always be able to continue to grow as a software developer throughout your career. But bootcamps aren’t right for everyone. To understand who should join a bootcamp and how they should approach the task of finding the right one, I sat down with Flatiron School’s Head of Online Instruction Peter Bell, who shared advice from years spent helping people make these very decisions. Here are the questions Bell recommends asking yourself before taking the leap.

If you’re interested in joining a bootcamp, be clear about your objectives.

Are you looking to get a full-time job as software dev, to enhance your skills with front-end dev as a designer, or to build the skills required to found a company? Each objective drives a different learning environment. Bell says the first job out of a bootcamp is the hardest job you’ll ever get; after that, you’ll be turning down offers within two years. Once you snag that first job, the only reason you wouldn’t succeed long-term is if you chose not to because you didn’t like the job.

Are you sure you really need to participate in a bootcamp to meet your career goals?

Bell says if you just want to be a product manager, you don’t necessarily need to learn to code to manage developers. Learning to code gives you deeper empathy, says Bell, but if your only goal is manage development, he says taking a bootcamp isn’t the most effective way to build skills you need. in addition to focusing deeply on skills you don’t need, bootcamps don’t cover a lot of skills regarding product design, agile, kanban, scrum, workflows, and other important things. Bell says bootcamps are primarily training you to be a junior engineer – not build or manage a dev team. So make sure you really want the software dev skills or want to become a software developer.

Have you tried free online labs to see if you actually like software development?

Bell recommends going to Code Academy or Flatirons Schools Bootcamp Prep Program where you can go through labs for free. These free online programs will show you whether you enjoy the process.

“The actual task of being a software developer is writing code. It doesn’t work, then you spend the rest of minute, hour, day or week getting it to work,” says Bell. “Do you find that frustrating or in general to be an enjoyable challenge?” Bell says if you spend hours or days or weeks getting it to work, finding the answer on StackOverflow, trying to figure out why the thing that worked yesterday doesn’t work yesterday, and enjoy this process the way you enjoy doing crossword puzzles, great.

“If you get frustrated when tech doesn’t work like it should, you won’t enjoy the task no matter how much you like developer salaries and opportunities,” says Bell.

Have you fully researched the bootcamp(s) you’re considering?

Assuming you want to become a software dev or have a reason to take a bootcamp, try to check on coursereport.com where graduates provide feedback from their experience. Bell advises you to take the time to look through those reports. Find out: does a particular bootcamp align with your values and learning style?

Do you want to do an-person bootcamp or an online course?

The first decision you’ll need to make is whether you are going to do an in-person bootcamp or an online course? Bell says the benefits of an in-person course is much more structure.
“You complete the course in less time and build good friendships and connections that help you get through program and succeed over time in your career,” says Bell. This is because it is easier to build a network during an in-person course.

“In-person is a wonderful experience,” says Bell. He says if you don’t live near an in-person bootcamp and the logistics of moving somewhere for three months, or you have a job or family that make a 60-70 hour week impractical, there are a number of online programs.

Whether the bootcamp you’re considering is in-person or online, Bell advises speaking with one of instructors. It is important to figure out the instructor’s objectives and background. Bell advises interviewing a bootcamp company the same way you’d interview a place to work for. He says not to discount cultural alignment.

“You’re looking for a place that values similar things,” says Bell.

Ask them specific questions about learning environment, and what to do when students are struggling or having trouble with motivation or other issues. Admit your weaknesses upfront to see if it’s a good fit. Bell says you’ll get a good sense for whether the program adopts a “be tough or else you won’t make it” approach or is a more supportive and engaging environment.

Has the bootcamp you’re considering scaled quickly?

It is not wrong for a bootcamp to be large, but there are cultural challenges with scaling any organisation. As with any company growing too fast, be particularly careful about the quality of the instructors you’re going to be working with.

“That will have a big impact on experience,” says Bell. He also advises asking for their jobs report – do they have some statistics on what percentage of grads get a job and average salary, and ideally listed by a third-party. Those statistics can shed light on the quality of the program, regardless of scale.

Final Thoughts

Bootcamps aren’t for everyone. Be clear what you’re looking to achieve from attending one, whether it’s the right program for you, and plan to invest energy into going above and beyond the requirements.

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